Love Your Neighbor, SSATB and percussion-Unterseher

SSATB with percussion

What we call “The Golden Rule” or “The Ethic of Reciprocity” is the most common moral idea throughout human societies as far back as we know. This setting is in a different style than what most people expect from me, more of a pop style, a “vocal a cappella” feel. Using either percussion instruments or vocal percussion is highly reccomended

Purchase on Reg’s web site

PROGRAM NOTES

From www.religioustolerance.org:

“Ethic of Reciprocity” passages from various religions.

Bahá’í Faith:
“Ascribe not to any soul that which thou wouldst not have ascribed to thee, and say not that which thou doest not.” “Blessed is he who preferreth his brother before himself.” Baha’u’llah

“And if thine eyes be turned towards justice, choose thou for thy neighbour that which thou choosest for thyself.” Epistle to the Son of the Wolf. 1

Brahmanism:
“This is the sum of Dharma [duty]: Do naught unto others which would cause you pain if done to you”. Mahabharata, 5:1517 ”

Buddhism:
“…a state that is not pleasing or delightful to me, how could I inflict that upon another?” Samyutta NIkaya v. 353

Hurt not others in ways that you yourself would find hurtful.” Udana-Varga 5:18

“All men tremble at the rod, all men fear death:
Putting oneself in the place of others, kill not nor cause to kill.
All men tremble at the rod, unto all men life is dear;
Doing as one would be done by, kill not nor cause to kill.”

“One should seek for others the happiness one desires for oneself.”

Christianity:
“Therefore all things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them: for this is the law and the prophets.” Matthew 7:12, King James Version.

“And as ye would that men should do to you, do ye also to them likewise.” Luke 6:31, King James Version.

“…and don’t do what you hate…”, Gospel of Thomas 6. The Gospel of Thomas is one of about 40 gospels that circulated among the early Christian movement, but which never made it into the Christian Scriptures (New Testament).

Confucianism:
He appears to have been the first person to record the Golden Rule in its negative form. This is sometimes referred to as the “Silver Rule.”
Do not do to others what you do not want them to do to you” Doctrine of the Mean

“What I do not wish men to do to me, I also wish not to do to men.” Analects 15:23

What a man dislikes in those who are over him, let him not display toward those who are under him; what he dislikes in those who are under him, let him not display toward those who are over him! This is called the standard, by which, as a measuring square, to regulate one’s conduct. 6

“Tse-kung asked, ‘Is there one word that can serve as a principle of conduct for life?’ Confucius replied, ‘It is the word ‘shu’ — reciprocity. Do not impose on others what you yourself do not desire.'” Doctrine of the Mean 13.3

He also expressed the Golden Rule in its positive form:
“Try your best to treat others as you would wish to be treated yourself, and you will find that this is the shortest way to benevolence.” Mencius VII.A.4

“There are four things in the moral life of man, not one of which I have been able to carry out in my life. To serve my father as I would
expect my son to serve me: that I have not been able to do. To serve my sovereign as I would expect a minister under me to serve me:
that I have not been able to do. To act towards my elder brother, as I would expect my younger brother to act towards me: that I have
not been able to do. To be the first to behave toward friends as I would expect them to behave towards me: that I have not been able
to do. 6

Ancient Egyptian:
“Do for one who may do for you, that you may cause him thus to do.” The Tale of the Eloquent Peasant, 109 – 110 Translated by R.B. Parkinson. The original dates to circa 1800 BCE and may be the earliest version of the Epic of Reciprocity ever written. 2

Hinduism:
“This is the sum of duty: do not do to others what would cause pain if done to you.” Mahabharata 5:1517

The religion of the Incas:
“Do not to another what you would not yourself experience.” Manco Capoc, founder of the empire of Peru. 6

Islam:
“None of you [truly] believes until he wishes for his brother what he wishes for himself.” Number 13 of Imam “Al-Nawawi’s Forty Hadiths.” 3

Hadiths are writings by Muhammad. There do not appear to be any verses in the Qur’an that explicitly state the Golden Rule.

Jainism:
“Therefore, neither does he [a sage] cause violence to others nor does he make others do so.” Acarangasutra 5.101-2.

“In happiness and suffering, in joy and grief, we should regard all creatures as we regard our own self.” Lord Mahavira, 24th Tirthankara

A man should wander about treating all creatures as he himself would be treated. “Sutrakritanga 1.11.33

Love Your Neighbor

Love your neighbor as yourself
for when we love our neighbors as ourselves,
we can create love, freedom, joy, peace, and harmony.

–Reginald Unterseher, 1991

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About Reginald Unterseher

Reginald Unterseher is Music Director and Composer-in-Residence at Shalom United Church of Christ, Richland, Washington. His works are published by Oxford University Press, Walton Music, and through NW Choral Publishing at www.reginaldunterseher.com.

He is the Washington State Music Teacher’s Association’s “Composer of the Year” for 2013.

Mr. Unterseher’s compositions are regularly performed throughout the world and have been featured at ACDA and MENC conventions in the US as well as at Carnegie Hall in New York City.

He currently serves as Repertoire & Standards Chair for Men’s Choirs for the Northwest Division of the American Choral Director’s Association, and is in demand as a choral and vocal adjudicator and clinician. Mr. Untereseher is a past Artistic Director of Consort Columbia (now Mid-Columbia Mastersingers), founder and past Chorus Master of Washington East Opera, and an active member of Male Ensemble Northwest.